NEWS – July 2014 – Teachers at groundwater training, Lubbock, TX

The AGWT two-day teacher training program held in Lubbock, TX in July showed teachers and educators how water topics can be effectively incorporated in the science curriculum.  The program was organized in partnership with the Texas Education Service Center, Region 17. The American Ground Water Trust has organized over 70 similar training programs for teachers in 17 states attended by close to 1,800 teachers and educators. The Lubbock program showed the value of having citizens understand environmental “cause and effect” with regard to water use and supply.  Presenters from West Texas explained the scientific and technical background to those aspects of the hydrologic system most important for the region.  Presentations ranged from the historical: “the importance of windmills (wind pumps) in the development of the high plains” and “the first water conservation district in Texas- it all began in Lubbock” to the technical: “Advances in agricultural irrigation system efficiency” andWeather modification in Texas: how it works – and the results.” In addition to AGWT staff presentations, invited speakers included representatives from the High Plains Water District, the City of Lubbock Water Utilities, The US Geological Survey, Gicon Pumps, and West Texas Weather Modification Association. Funds for the program were raised from local industries and companies, many of who sponsored individual teachers.

The AGWT two-day teacher training program held in Lubbock, TX in July showed teachers and educators how water topics can be effectively incorporated in the science curriculum.  The program was organized in partnership with the Texas Education Service Center, Region 17. The American Ground Water Trust has organized over 70 similar training programs for teachers in 17 states attended by close to 1,800 teachers and educators. The Lubbock program showed the value of having citizens understand environmental “cause and effect” with regard to water use and supply.  Presenters from West Texas explained the scientific and technical background to those aspects of the hydrologic system most important for the region.  Presentations ranged from the historical: “the importance of windmills (wind pumps) in the development of the high plains” and “the first water conservation district in Texas- it all began in Lubbock” to the technical: “Advances in agricultural irrigation system efficiency” andWeather modification in Texas: how it works – and the results.” In addition to AGWT staff presentations, invited speakers included representatives from the High Plains Water District, the City of Lubbock Water Utilities, The US Geological Survey, Gicon Pumps, and West Texas Weather Modification Association. Funds for the program were raised from local industries and companies, many of who sponsored individual teachers.