NEWS – November 2014 - West Coast Workshops, Washington and California

HOW TO GET THE MOST FROM YOUR WATER WELL

The American Ground Water Trust organized three west coast workshop programs in November that focused on well and pump technology (Seattle, WA and Stockton and Lakewood CA.)  Inefficient wells cost millions of dollars in increased pumping costs and in unnecessary increments to the nation’s carbon footprint. All too often, well owners are not aware that simple routine data collection of yield and water level drawdown can pin-point declining efficiency, even if the well continues to meet demand for water. We all know that we should not wait until the oil-light come on in a vehicle before changing the oil.  In a similar way, well owners should not wait until well yields decline before checking the water levels in their wells.  The workshop program included basic well hydraulics, well design criteria so that wells can maximize the potential of the aquifer, provided guidance on how to select the right pump and make use of intelligent computer controls to minimize pumping costs while maintaining the desired well yield. 

            These three workshop programs showed irrigators and municipal supply operators how to save energy, manage resources efficiently and reduce infrastructure costs. Presenters at the workshops included  David Kill, Training Consultant, Xylem Goulds Water Technology, St. Paul, MN; Kevin McGillicuddy, Senior Hydrogeologist, Roscoe Moss Company, Los Angeles, CA; Noel S. Philip, WA Dept. of Ecology, Bellevue, WA; Neil Mansuy, VP, Subsurface Technologies, Kansas City, MO; Jim Bailey, National Well Services Director, Shannon & Wilson, Seattle, WA; Tanner Tryon, General Manager, Hose Solutions, Inc., Scottsdale, AZ; Norman Howard, Western Sales, Cotey Chemicals, Lubbock, TX; Dan Peters, Applications Engineer, Yaskawa America, Inc., Cypress, CA; Chris Johnson, Aegis Groundwater Consulting, Fresno, CA and Carlos Guerra, Product Manager, Hose Solutions, Inc., Scottsdale, AZ.  The photograph (courtesy of Roscoe Moss Company) shows the installation of a louvered well screen.